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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Mathematics


Course Descriptions for (MATH) 7xx and 8xx

700 — Linear Algebra. (3) Vector spaces, linear transformations, dual spaces, decompositions of spaces, and canonical forms.

701 — Algebra I. (3) Algebraic structures, sub-structures, products, homomorphisms, and quotient structures of groups, rings, and modules.

702 — Algebra II. (3)  Fields and field extensions. Galois theory, topics from, transcendent field extensions, algebraically closed fields, finite fields.
Prerequisite: MATH 701

703 — Analysis I. (3) Compactness, completeness, continuous functions. Outer measures, measurable sets, extension theorem and Lebesgue-Stieltjes measure. Integration and convergence theorems. Product measures and Fubini's theorem. Differentiation theory. Theorems of Egorov and Lusin. Lp-spaces. Analytic functions: Cauchy-Riemann equations, elementary special functions. Conformal mappings. Cauchy's integral theorem and formula. Classification of singularities, Laurent series, the Argument Principle. Residue theorem, evaluation of integrals and series.

704 — Analysis II. (3) Compactness, completeness, continuous functions. Outer measures, measurable sets, extension theorem and Lebesgue-Stieltjes measure. Integration and convergence theorems. Product measures and Fubini's theorem. Differentiation theory. Theorems of Egorov and Lusin. Lp-spaces. Analytic functions: Cauchy-Riemann equations, elementary special functions. Conformal mappings. Cauchy's integral theorem and formula. Classification of singularities, Laurent series, the Argument Principle. Residue theorem, evaluation of integrals and series.

705 — Analysis III. (3) Signed and complex measures, Radon-Nikodym theorem, decomposition theorems. Metric spaces and topology, Baire category, Stone-Weierstrass theorem, Arzela-Ascoli theorem. Introduction to Banach and Hilbert spaces, Riesz representation theorems.
Prerequisite: MATH 703, 704

708 — Foundations of Computational Mathematics I. (3)  Approximation of functions by algebraic polynomials, splines, and trigonometric polynomials; numerical differentiation; numerical integration; orthogonal polynomials and Gaussian quadrature; numerical solution of nonlinear systems, unconstrained optimization.
Prerequisite: MATH 554 or equivalent upper level undergraduate course in Real Analysis

709 — Foundations of Computational Mathematics II. (3)  Vectors and matrices; QR factorization; conditioning and stability; solving systems of equations; eigenvalue/eigenvector problems; Krylov subspace iterative methods; singular value decomposition. Includes theoretical development of concepts and practical algorithm implementation.
Prerequisite: MATH 544 or 526, or equivalent upper level undergraduate course in Real Analysis

710 — Probability Theory I. {=STAT 710} (3)  Probability spaces, random variables and distributions, expectations, characteristic functions, laws of large numbers, and the central limit theorem.
Prerequisite: STAT 511, 512, or MATH 703

711 — Probability Theory II. {=STAT 711} (3) More about distributions, limit theorems, Poisson approximations, conditioning, martingales, and random walks.
Prerequisite: MATH 710

720 — Applied Mathematics I. (3)  Modeling and solution techniques for differential and integral equations from sciences and engineering, including a study of boundary and initial value problems, integral equations, and eigenvalue problems using transform techniques, Green’s functions, and variational principles. 

721 — Applied Mathematics II. (3)  Foundations of approximation of functions by Fourier series in Hilbert space; fundamental PDEs in mathematical physics; fundamental equations for continua; integral and differential operators in Hilbert spaces. Basic modeling theory and solution techniques for stochastic differential equations. 

Prerequisite: MATH 720

722 — Numerical Optimization. (3) Topics in optimization; includes linear programming, integer programming, gradient methods, least squares techniques, and discussion of existing mathematical software.
Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of the department

723 — Differential Equations. (3)  Elliptic equations: fundamental solutions, maximum principles, Green’s function, energy method and Dirichlet principle; Sobolev spaces: weak derivatives, extension and trace theorems; weak solutions and Fredholm alternative, regularity, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions.
Prerequisite: MATH 703, 704 or permission of instructor

724 — Differential Equations II. (3)  Detailed study of the following topics: method of characteristics; Hamilton-Jacobi equations; conservation laws; heat equation; wave equation; linear parabolic equations; linear hyperbolic equations.
Prereq: MATH 723

725 — Approximation Theory. (3) Approximation of functions; existence, uniqueness and characterization of best approximants; Chebyshev's theorem; Chebyshev polynomials; degree of approximation; Jackson and Bernstein theorems; B-splines; approximation by splines; quasi-interpolants; spline interpolation.
Prereq: Concurrent enrollment or passing grade in MATH 703

726 — Numerical Differential Equations I. (3) Finite difference and finite volume methods for ODEs and PDEs of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic type. This course covers development, implementation, stability, consistency, convergence analysis, and error estimates.
Prerequisite: MATH 708, 709 or permission of instructor

727 — Numerical Differential Equations II. (3)  Ritz and Galerkin weak formulation. Finite element, mixed finite element, collocation methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic PDEs, including development, implementation, stability, consistency, convergence analysis, and error estimates.
Prerequisite: MATH 726

728 — Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

729 — Nonlinear Approximation. (3)  Nonlinear approximation from piecewise polynomial (spline) functions in the univariate and multivariate case, characterization of the approximation spaces via Besov spaces and interpolation, Newman's and Popov's theorems for rational approximation, characterization of the approximation spaces of rational approximation, nonlinear n-term approximation from bases in Hilbert spaces and from unconditional bases in Lp(p>1), greedy algorithms, application of nonlinear approximation to image compression.
Prereq: MATH 703

730 — General Topology I. (3) Topological spaces, filters, compact spaces, connected spaces, uniform spaces, complete spaces, topological groups, function spaces.

731 — General Topology II. (3) Topological spaces, filters, compact spaces, connected spaces, uniform spaces, complete spaces, topological groups, function spaces.

732 — Algebraic Topology I. (3) The fundamental group, homological algebra, simplicial complexes, homology and cohomology groups, cup-product, triangulable spaces.
Prerequisite: MATH 730 or 705, and 701

733 — Algebraic Topology II. (3) The fundamental group, homological algebra, simplicial complexes, homology and cohomology groups, cup-product, triangulable spaces.
Prerequisite: MATH 730 or 705, and 701

734 — Differential Geometry. (3)  Differentiable manifolds; classical theory of surfaces and hypersurfaces in Euclidean space; tensors, forms and integration of forms; connections and covariant differentiation; Riemannian manifolds; geodesics and the exponential map; curvature; Jacobi fields and comparison theorems, generalized Gauss-Bonnet theorem.
Prerequisite: MATH 550

735 — Lie Groups. (3)  Manifolds; topological groups, coverings and covering groups; Lie groups and their Lie algebras; closed subgroups of Lie groups; automorphism groups and representations; elementary theory of Lie algebras; simply connected Lie groups; semisimple Lie groups and their Lie algebras.
Prerequisite: MATH 705 or 730

738 — Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

741 — Algebra III. (3)  Theory of groups, rings, modules, fields and division rings, bilinear forms, advanced topics in matrix theory, and homological techniques.
Prerequisite: MATH 702

742 — Representation Theory. (3)  Representation and character theory of finite groups (especially the symmetric group) and/or the general linear group, Young tableaux, the Littlewood Richardson rule, and Schur functors.
Prerequisite:  MATH 702

743 — Lattice Theory. (3)  Sublattices, homomorphisms and direct products of lattices; freely generated lattices; modular lattices and projective geometries; the Priestley and Stone dualities for distributive and Boolean lattices; congruence relations on lattices.
Prerequisite:  MATH 702

744 — Matrix Theory. (3)  Extremal properties of positive definite and hermitian matrices, doubly stochastic matrices, totally non-negative matrices, eigenvalue monotonicity, Hadamard-Fisher determinantal inequalities.
Prerequisite: MATH 700

746 — Commutative Algebra. (3) Prime spectrum and Zariski topology; finite, integral, and flat extensions; dimension; depth; homological techniques, normal and regular rings.
Prerequisite:  MATH 701

747 — Algebraic Geometry. (3)  Properties of affine and projective varieties defined over algebraically closed fields, rational mappings, birational geometry and divisors especially on curves and surfaces, Bezout's theorem, Riemann-Roch theorem for curves.
Prerequisite:  MATH 701

748 — Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

750 — Fourier Analysis. (3)  The Fourier transform on the circle and line, convergence of Fejer means; Parseval's relation and the square summable theory, convergence and divergence at a point; conjugate Fourier series, the conjugate function and the Hilbert transform, the Hardy-Littlewood maximal operator and Hardy spaces.
Prerequisite:  MATH 703, 704

751 — The Mathematical Theory of Wavelets. (3) The L1 and L2 theory of the Fourier transform on the line, bandlimited functions and the Paley-Weiner theorem, Shannon-Whittacker Sampling Theorem, Riesz systems, Mallat-Meyer multiresolution analysis in Lebesgue spaces, scaling functions, wavelet constructions, wavelet representation and unconditional bases, nonlinear approximation, Riesz's factorization lemma, and Daubechies' compactly supported wavelets.
Prerequisite:  MATH 703

752 — Complex Analysis. (3)  Normal families, meromorphic functions, Weierstrass product theorem, conformal maps and the Riemann mapping theorem, analytic continuation and Riemann surfaces, harmonic and subharmonic functions.
Prerequisite:  MATH 703, 704

754 — Several Complex Variables. (3)  Properties of holomorphic functions of several variables, holomorphic mappings, plurisubharmonic functions, domains of convergence of power series, domains of holomorphy and pseudoconvex domains, harmonic analysis in several variables.
Prerequisite:  MATH 703, 704

755 — Applied Functional Analysis. (3)  Banach spaces, Hilbert spaces, spectral theory of bounded linear operators, Fredholm alternatives, integral equations, fixed point theorems with applications, least square approximation.
Prerequisite:  MATH 703

756 — Functional Analysis I. (3 each)  Linear topological spaces; Hahn-Banach theorem; closed graph theorem; uniform boundedness principle; operator theory; spectral theory; topics from linear differential operators or Banach algebras.
Prerequisite:  MATH 704

757 — Functional Analysis II. (3 each)  Linear topological spaces; Hahn-Banach theorem; closed graph theorem; uniform boundedness principle; operator theory; spectral theory; topics from linear differential operators or Banach algebras.
Prerequisite:  MATH 704

758 — Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

760 — Set Theory. (3) An axiomatic development of set theory: sets and classes; recursive definitions and inductive proofs; the axiom of choice and its consequences; ordinals; infinite cardinal arithmetic; combinatorial set theory.

761 — The Theory of Computable Functions. (3) Models of computation; recursive functions, random access machines, Turing machines, and Markov algorithms; Church's Thesis; universal machines and recursively unsolvable problems; recursively enumerable sets; the recursion theorem; the undecidability of elementary arithmetic.

762 — Model Theory. (3) First order predicate calculus; elementary theories; models, satisfaction, and truth; the completeness, compactness, and omitting types theorems; countable models of complete theories; elementary extensions; interpolation and definability; preservation theorems; ultraproducts.

768 — Selected Topics in Foundations of Mathematics. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

770 — Discrete Optimization. (3) The application and analysis of algorithms for linear programming problems, including the simplex algorithm, algorithms and complexity, network flows, and shortest path algorithms. No computer programming experience required.

774 — Discrete Mathematics I. (3) An introduction to the theory and applications of discrete mathematics. Topics include enumeration techniques, combinatorial identities, matching theory, basic graph theory, and combinatorial designs.

775 — Discrete Mathematics II. (3)  A continuation of MATH 774. Additional topics will be selected from: the structure and extremal properties of partially ordered sets, matroids, combinatorial algorithms, matrices of zeros and ones, and coding theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 774 or consent of the instructor

776 — Graph Theory I. (3) The study of the structure and extremal properties of graphs, including Eulerian and Hamiltonian paths, connectivity, trees, Ramsey theory, graph coloring, and graph algorithms.

777 — Graph Theory II. (3)  Continuation of MATH 776. Additional topics will be selected from: reconstruction problems, independence, genus, hypergraphs, perfect graphs, interval representations, and graph-theoretical models.
Prerequisite: MATH 776 or consent of instructor

778 — Selected Topics in Discrete Mathematics. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

780 — Elementary Number Theory. (3) Diophantine equations, distribution of primes, factoring algorithms, higher power reciprocity, Schnirelmann density, and sieve methods.

782 — Analytic Number Theory I. (3)  The prime number theorem, Dirichlet's theorem, the Riemann zeta function, Dirichlet's L-functions, exponential sums, Dirichlet series, Hardy-Littlewood method partitions, and Waring's problem.
Prerequisite: MATH 580 and 552

783 — Analytic Number Theory II. (3)  The prime number theorem, Dirichlet's theorem, the Riemann zeta function, Dirichlet's L-functions, exponential sums, Dirichlet series, Hardy-Littlewood method partitions, and Waring's problem.
Prerequisite: MATH 580 and 552

784 — Algebraic Number Theory. (3)  Algebraic integers, unique factorization of ideals, the ideal class group, Dirichlet's unit theorem, application to Diophantine equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 546 and 580

785 — Transcendental Number Theory. (3)  Thue-Siegel-Roth theorem, Hilbert's seventh problem, diophantine approximation.
Prerequisite: MATH 580

788 — Selected Topics in Number Theory. (3) Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

790 — Graduate Seminar. (1) (Although this course is required of all candidates for the master's degree it is not included in the total credit hours in the master's program.)

791 — Mathematics Pedagogy I (0-1)  
First of two required math pedagogy courses for graduate assistants in the department. Pedagogical topics include assessment theory, discourse, theory, lesson planning, and classroom management. Applications assist graduate students with syllabusnesson/assessment creation, teacher questioning, midcourse evaluations, and student learning and engagement.

792 — Mathematics Pedagogy II (0-1)  Second of two required math pedagogy courses for graduate assistants in the department. Pedagogical topics include student-learning and reflection theories, sociomathematical norms, and constructivism. Applications assist graduates with lesson/revision/reflection, student-centered investigations, curriculum problem solving and metacognition.
Prerequisites: Satisfactory grade in MATH 791

797 — Mathematics into Print. (3) The exposition of advanced mathematics emphasizing the organization of proofs and the formulation of concepts; computer typesetting systems for producing mathematical theses, books, and articles.

798 — Directed Readings and Research. (1-6) 

Prerequisite: full admission to graduate study in mathematics

799 — Thesis Preparation. (1-9) For master's candidates.

890 — Graduate Seminar. (1-3) A review of current literature in specified subject areas involving student presentations. Content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title. Minimum of 3 credit hours required of all doctoral students. (Pass-Fail grading)

899 — Dissertation Preparation. (1-12) For doctoral candidates.